Myths Vs Facts about Autism

Myths Facts
Autism is caused by bad parenting. Autism is a condition whereby the brain is developed differently from others.
Autism affect certain racial groups more than others. Autism is found all over the world in families of every racial, ethnic and social background.
Autism is a childhood condition. Autism is a condition that lasts throughout a person's life. Behaviors may change as the child develops and receives appropriate interventions.
Autism can be cured. Currently, Autism is a condition that does not have a cure. However, children with Autism respond very well to structured early intervention, education and vocational placements.
People with Autism do not like to socialize. They are keen to make friends but may find it challenging to do so.
People with autism avoid eye contact. When they are relaxed and comfortable with person they are communicating with, they may have eye contact.
People with Autism cannot communicate with others. There is verbal and non-verbal communication. Some will develop speech seemingly effortlessly, but will require help to interact appropriately with their peers. Others require assistance to communicate their basic needs and wants, using a combination of words, gestures, and pictures.
People with autism are unable to show affection. People with autism do give affection. However, due to differences in sensory processing and social understanding, they show affection in a way that may differ from others.
People with Autism are unable to live independent and successful lives. Many of them grow up and contribute to the society if they are provided with the education.
People with Autism are all gifted with extraordinary talents and skills. About 10% of individuals with Autism may have special abilities in areas like music, art, mathematical calculations, memory and manual dexterity. The majority may have areas of high performance with relation to their interests or obsessions.

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